Sowing Or Reaping

sowing

Lately I’ve been reflecting on how little I have to say about the financial world. Blame it on the California drought, but man I’ve been in a dry spell with writing. See? That was a terrible joke. This is partially because I haven’t been on the hunt for any particular deals or working on any new DIY projects. In fact, I’ve been failing in some areas that are usually very important to me! I went about $150 over our grocery budget last month out of sheer laziness. Those smaller trips to the store for one or two items can really add up. But the nice thing is, there is really no consequence other than self-induced guilt. This is a welcome change from a few years back. I take comfort in that maybe for this period of our lives, we’re just steadily moving along and so there’s nothing beyond the regular (savings, retirement, bills) to strive for. I recently automated both tithing and saving transfers for the first time. It’s a great feeling, but leaves me with even less to think about! We finished being swallowed alive by my husband’s union initiation payments in June and had a few months off in our church donations due to a transition. Both things have helped us climb ahead and reach a very comfortable norm. A relief? Sure. Boring? Definitely.

One thing that I’m certain will breed more interesting topics to write on is that we are expecting our first child this winter. Oh the money saving tips and needed advice that will come with adding a new member to the family! I’m looking forward to the challenges.

MoneyBaby

It occurred to me that I have felt more like I have been in a season of reaping rather than sowing–but minus the satisfaction of a job well done. Enjoying the comforts of home and marriage has been nice, but it also hasn’t felt like the greatest accomplishment. I have been reminded many times that creating a life and all that comes with it, mainly being sick in multiple ways at once; is work in itself. I think it’s a little harder to see this stage of parenthood as that because we don’t have a physical kid in our arms to feed, put to bed, etc. But I felt contentment when I realized that what I am doing right now (suffering) is important and valuable–just not in the earthly form of a paycheck that I am used to.

And what does this mean for our finances? Well, nothing. Just that there is no second income to contribute extra to savings or splurge on things we don’t need. It’s been hard for me as I assumed these last few months before I really started showing would be where I worked the most and got in those last few big paydays before leaving the workforce all together. After all, I’ve spent the last four and a half years striving to get steady union work, and lately it has felt like the momentum was there and the offers were finally starting to become more consistent. Various non-negotiable family commitments this month prevented me from taking one job in particular that would have been the perfect high-paying send off from a producer who has given me some of my biggest gigs to date. But is that what is really most important? No. And is it even worth it when your health is at risk? The last job I worked was in my first trimester and I was throwing up on set, in questionable working conditions and stressed out of my mind because the director was a cold-hearted snake. Oops, did I write that out loud? There was no question I needed to rest after it came and went, but I am finally at a point where I wish I were working again and can’t due to other obligations. Not to mention the fact that some weeks I have as many as three weekday doctor’s appointments and there is no way I could work 60+ hours Monday through Friday and pull that off.

I guess my point is there are seasons in our lives where we think we’re only reaping the benefits of our labor (or our spouse’s)–but we are actually sowing and may not realize until later. I trust that where I am today is where I am supposed to be and take comfort in the fact that God knows better than me. It may not yet feel as satisfying as adding another accomplishment to your resume or receiving a check on Fridays, but there is no question it will trump those things in the long run. As adults, we hopefully know by now that most of life’s riches do not come in the form of money. Have you ever had a season of your life that felt boring and unaccomplished but actually turned out to be quite profitable (monetarily or otherwise)?

 

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4 thoughts on “Sowing Or Reaping

  1. I go through dry writing spells, too.

    I recommend the book, “Baby Bargains”. Lots of good advice and ideas for saving money–just like a wedding, it’s so easy to get caught up in all the “stuff” you are told that you NEED to have for your baby to be healthy and happy!!! Whenever I would find myself caught up in that, I would think of mamas in Kenya, and would calm down.

    I also read “Smart Money, Smart Kids”, by Dave Ramsey and Rachel Cruze. A little early for some of the techniques that they teach, but good to start thinking about ahead of time.

    So sorry you’ve been sooo sick–multiple doctor visits already sounds like there are other things going on other than just morning sickness. Prayers with you!

  2. I love that you have the wisdom to realize that your life is just entering a different season. Having a baby is a huge change and it make sense that it would affect your financial choices right now – it should! (even if it’s spending more on groceries because you are just too miserable to spend extra time planning).
    Please continue to give yourself grace and know that God already has this all mapped out for your good. I think you are absolutely sowing right now, even if it feels stagnant.
    Shawna

  3. Allison, that is a good mentality. Similarly, I always think about past generations and how they managed to raise healthy, smart children without much more than a few wooden toys and a crib. It’s easy to get caught up in all the fuss around baby products, but in reality the “needs” are very few. Thanks for the book recommendations!

    Shawna, thanks for your encouragement dear friend!

  4. Pingback: Practicing Contentment Will Make You Rich | Knuckles & Twine

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