Preparing For Baby Doesn’t Have To Be Expensive

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Everyone tells you that having children is expensive. Long-term, that absolutely makes sense when you consider food, clothing, shelter, college–but what are some short-term ways you can save? I am just about 38 weeks pregnant and have only spent $115.00 on a baby I should be giving birth to in the next two weeks. And I waited almost nine months to spend any money at all–specifically until the week of Black Friday. Everything I have purchased so far has been on sale or was discounted in some other way. It took some serious self-restraint–but it was also kind of a fun challenge once I had made up my mind.

Two things factored into my decision to hold out on baby related purchases: I knew I’d be having a shower and that two weeks later would be the biggest sale weekend of the year. I was very generously blessed at my shower and by my parents which covered almost all of my needs. Note I said needs. I didn’t go overboard with my registry–adding every cute thing I wanted–or any decor items, clothes, toys, etc. I tried to be as minimalist as possible, selecting items I thought I’d use in the beginning, knowing that I could reevaluate when I had a better idea of what I was doing and what my baby was like. I also chose things that I thought would work for the baby through the toddler stage so that I wouldn’t have to purchase new gear every year.

The other really great tactic I found was in creating a nursery fund. Similar to my purse fund–I created an envelope of money that was strictly to be used for items that would go in the baby’s room. The money came from selling a large bookshelf that was in the space previously and made it possible for us to buy any crafts, wall decor or little touches we may want for the room without feeling like we were needlessly spending. Some practical nursery items we didn’t receive at the shower like a laundry basket and crib sheets (RH Baby & Child outlet score $69 marked down to 16.99!!) were also purchased using this money rather than “our own”. The big comfy chair I snagged last year from another Restoration Hardware outlet remains and I didn’t change the curtains or shelving (which I made myself!). Using what you already have saves. Baby won’t know. I found a huge free pegboard from a Craigslist post that my neighborhood art store advertised. I went and snagged it, slapped some paint on there to match the curtains and made myself a cute little changing station/wall set up–saving a lot of money in the process! Pegboards are surprisingly expensive.

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Here are how my money saving purchases went down: The week of Black Friday, Amazon already started their wave of Cyber Monday sales, so I closely monitored them to ensure I wasn’t missing anything I had planned on buying. The place where I registered sent out an email to inform people of the best baby websites having sales that week–which also proved incredibly helpful! I had never been to a Buy Buy Baby before because they aren’t in the city. I waited until I was home for Thanksgiving where there is one close to my parent’s house and went on Black Friday. There were no special sales, but they carry absolutely everything you could dream up and take limitless 20% off coupons the same way Bed, Bath and Beyond does (same company). I also learned they do price matching, which is a pretty sweet deal when you factor in the coupons. I had a few gift cards from my shower, returned some unnecessary items and used cash rewards from our Discover card to purchase everything I didn’t get from Black Friday sales. Using these tactics, I accomplished things like spending .38 cents on my Ergo baby carrier–and $16 on a Graco rocker which was also 35% off on Cyber Monday. Everything you see listed below is not the whole of what I have purchased–it’s just what wasn’t free. All other items were either gifted to me, came out of the nursery fund, or paid for by one of the various methods previously mentioned. And you know what? I could have trimmed the list down even more if I had really wanted to. I don’t need a sunshade for the car yet–I don’t need pacifiers or baby bottles in the beginning. But since I don’t live near a Buy Buy Baby, I was trying to avoid the hour drive it would take to get to the nearest location around here later on.

$29.45 Puj bathtub 50% off

$7.19 sunshade 20% off

$39.99 ear thermometer 20% off

$4.79 nail clipper 20% off

$.38 Ergo carrier gift card

$16.02 Graco rocker 35% off and rewards credit

$4.19 pacifier 20% off

$9.79 bottle 20% off

$3.49 mittens 20% off

= $115.29 total spent on baby so far

As I mentioned last week, my husband and I have still held out on Amazon Prime despite being very tempted to renew it. I’ve found that in November and December, things have arrived in two days despite not being members because of the Christmas rush. And it hasn’t been hard to find more than $35 worth of things to purchase at a time in order to be eligible for free shipping. I didn’t officially register for my baby shower at Amazon, but I privately made a registry so I could get the 10% off after the shower date had passed. Only three of the items on my list were eligible and the total savings was something like $4 because all three things were very cheap. The purchases were covered by a gift card, but I didn’t find that tool to be super helpful. Many will tell you that getting that, coupled with Amazon Mom (free with Prime and adds a 5% bump to registry discount) is well worth it–but I didn’t find that to be the case. And you have a month to use your registry discount, so if you don’t have Prime and are considering it–you can hold out like I did to see if it would be worth investing in for the 15% off.

Of course these items don’t cover maternity needs–like any special care you may want to give yourself to add comfort to your situation, specialty bras or clothes. I did spend money on myself in that capacity–but I don’t consider those items purchases for the baby. And even in doing so, I was careful to watch sales and be smart about what was truly a necessity versus a want. For example, I bought one of those Snoogle pillows women rave about on Craigslist for $15 (it retails for $60-70 depending where you get it) and then bought a new cover on Amazon with credit card rewards points (the covers run around $30). So I saved $75 on the pillow all together. And even after doing so, I am still not convinced it was a need–though others will swear by it. I also kept my clothes shopping to a minimum–even though this is a definite need. I am not the kind of person who minds repeating outfits, in fact I prefer it, so it wasn’t an issue to rotate through the same dozen or so maternity shirts.

The one very obvious and very helpful tool that I haven’t used but you should if you are comfortable with–is borrowing from those who’ve had a baby before you. I know many people who got most of their kid’s wardrobe or gear that way. I am personally not a borrower, even though that probably is in violation of my frugal nature. I like the freedom of knowing I can destroy or lose something and not feel bad about it. Plus you can resell almost everything once you are done having children and that seems like a pretty good way to go.

Lastly, we have really great health insurance. I know this is a choice most people don’t get to control themselves–but I have to say, if you can find a good plan before you start having a family–it is worth it! My husband’s company completely covers labor and delivery so we have a $0 co-pay for the birth and hospital stay. We also get a free breast pump (I believe all carriers are supposed to offer this under the new health care laws), which can retail from $200-$300, if not more.

Obviously this lack of spending is about to change given that the baby will arrive in the next few weeks and new needs will be popping up (like diapering!). But in terms of preparing for the child in this exciting time, you can still be frugal and patient in your search. After all, you will probably be spending money on them for the rest of your life in one way or another–why start earlier than you have to? I highly recommend selling things to not only make room for baby, but to accumulate a nursery fund so you can avoid spending on that. You can also find just about any baby gear used on Craigslist if you keep checking back. And finally, don’t underestimate the generosity of others and the ways they want to provide for you in this time. Haven’t you been to a baby shower by now where you gifted the person of honor? It’s not something to feel bad about assuming you have or would do the same for a friend when her time comes. Imagine how much you could save by implementing a few easy exercises of self-discipline into your nesting expectations. Please share your tactics below!

 

Gift Giving For The Frugal

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It’s almost mid-December, so I’m sure we’re all knee deep in Christmas shopping, or if you’re anything like me–you might be done by now. Something that occurred to me in this season is that people may assume being frugal and being generous are mutually exclusive in terms of gift giving and I’m here to say that just isn’t the case! It’s all about planning and finding the right gift and the right deal at the right time. A helpful tactic I enjoy with one of my siblings and husband is telling one another what we’d like, sometimes even in November. That way you can track the thing and see if it goes on sale or at the very least have time to plan around the cost of it. And you can ensure that the giftee receives something she would like. It’s always a little tough to take a shot in the dark with gift giving. I know I really care whether or not the recipient would enjoy or get use out of the item I’m buying, so I try to be thoughtful about it. All too often I think people assume that something they would want must be what another would as well.

I tend to steer clear from homemade gifts–partially because I am not talented in any way that would contribute, but also because I don’t want to add to that person’s collection of useless items that may or may not be in her taste. I think it also adds the extra pressure of, “I can’t give this away because so and so made it by hand”. Your recipient shouldn’t feel stressed that she received something she now has to pull out every time you’re over to pretend like it’s in use. I’m sure the idea behind the thought is nice– you’re saving money and making an effort from the heart–but as a fellow frugalite, all I see is the saving money part and wonder if the person actually thought of me at all when making whatever the object is. Can you relate or do you think that’s off the mark? I’m sure there are plenty of talented folk who do just fine handing out mason jars of homemade cocoa and quilts (I wouldn’t mind the former). And to be fair, I’ve actually hired out help to make something creative before, but I’m talking an Etsy artist doing something very specifically geared toward the individual I was giving it to. It certainly didn’t save me any money–but I was very pleased with the personal end result. Maybe all you can afford to do is make gifts because it’s been a hard financial year. No judgment here, but for the purposes of this blog–I am writing to a financially stable audience who likes to save money even though they don’t have to.

Another tip–Black Friday is your friend! There is nothing wrong with this day other than the fact that in certain parts of the country–in certain stores–people go absolutely nuts. But I like to believe those guys are weirdos in general, so all the event is doing is unleashing that person’s flaws that normally show up in other ways. Not that this is good, but I don’t know if it’s really fair to write off a day in which awesome sales occur because you see people on the news losing their minds. That said, I wouldn’t go to Walmart. Anyhow, I’ve never had a stereotypical Black Friday experience in my three years of engaging in it. Last year I discovered that outlet malls were the place to go. Already marked down, sometimes high-end products for an even lower price? The stores are often 50% off the outlet prices and hand out coupons for 10-15% MORE at the door! There’s no better marriage of quality and frugal than that.

If bad parking and long lines for the bathroom still scare you off, Cyber Monday is also a wonderful alternative–and you can find some great deals on Amazon for the entire week. Most other retailers offer free shipping that whole weekend. What have you got to lose? This year Amazon did a discount code for books, which was helpful for one gift and I received daily emails (by choice) to be in the know of what the deal was each day. I’d say this is definitely your safest bet for successful Christmas shopping with little hassle. It’s not something to be scared of or dread. I also noticed this year that if I shopped with my Discover card that they were offering free gift wrapping on things I purchased from Amazon! I didn’t take this option, but it’s nice to know I could save whatever the cost of wrapping paper or paying for the service online would have been had I wanted it. There are a lot of great options out there that allow you to be generous, but cut corners and save money without looking like you did. Also, don’t forget how much goes on sale right before and right after the holiday itself. No better time to stock up on gift wrapping supplies, ornaments or stocking stuffers for next year. I still don’t have Amazon Prime, but managed to avoid all shipping costs by simply spending over the $35 minimum every time I placed an order. It all came within a few days anyway, presumably because of the higher number of purchases this month.

What are your clever tactics for the holiday gift giving season? Do you buy things on sale months in advance? Do you listen for clues at family gatherings? Spy on someone’s Amazon wishlist? I think Christmas registries would be so helpful, but I fear many people would think that goes too far. So for now–we have to be creative in the ways we give! Happy hunting and let us know what worked for you!

Strategizing Amidst The Craziness

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What is your first financial reaction to a hard week? To spend or save? I know for me, I want to spend to ease the difficulty. “Let’s eat out tonight, I’m too tired to plan a meal and cook”. Or, “we can make this easier by paying for that”. A few weeks ago my husband and I were tested by a series of events that made it so unbelievably tempting to escape it all by using money in flippant ways. As mentioned in my previous post, we were on a strict money diet due to over indulgence from a weekend away. September was our month to make it all back by being more frugal than usual.

We have known for months that at the end of the September we would be having two house guests for four days, followed by four house guests for five days the following week. I budgeted for this in my grocery shopping and made sure to include a homemade meal in the first couple’s visit and a hearty enough breakfast item to last the week and avoid spending three meals a day on restaurants. Eating out is the enemy when you’re trying to be good (and I think travelers would agree!). So, we were careful about where and how we chose to do that and I even bowed out of a couple of meal opportunities knowing that it would make the bill lower if I stayed home.

The evening they arrived, my sister (who is also my neighbor) went to the emergency room for stomach pains and it turned out to be a ten centimeter ovarian cyst that required same day surgical removal. Being the older sister, and her only family in town, I naturally wanted to be present for as much of the day as I could–full well knowing that I also had guests to entertain while my husband was at work. My sister has the same healthcare provider as us and one of the many advantages of where we live is that our hospital is within a few blocks of our apartment. I was able to dip in and out of there all day in between naps and surgery to check in on her, hang with her or wait to see her and get updates from the doctors and still keep our guests happy.

Blessing #1: Surgery went well and no emergency funds had to be pulled from in order to support the situation. Her insurance covered everything outside of a very small and reasonable co-pay and we were able to travel between the hospital and home with great ease and no cost.

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The weekend our friends were to arrive we woke up to a huge ant infestation in our kitchen two days in a row. I had a big morning of cooking planned for the following day in preparation for the guests. We called our landlord, who promptly handled it by sending a worker with supplies to try to remedy the situation. The ant traps and sprays didn’t really solve the problem, but it certainly helped and we didn’t have to spend a dime of our own money to make the fixes. It easily could have been a scenario where our landlord didn’t respond for days and made us go out to buy our own products. Instead, he also set up an exterminator for the following week which required us to pack up the entire apartment, pull out every kitchen drawer, take down the curtains, clear out the pantry, etc. We ended up compromising and only doing the kitchen, living room and bathroom which were the main areas where we have seen ants in the past. That meant everything went into the bedrooms and that I had to leave the apartment for at least eight hours. I took a short job that started the next day and spent my crucial time away from home prepping for it in a local coffee shop with my on the mend sister. For the cost of decaf latte I was paid a day of prep to get my house debugged. Also nice to have a boost of second income when trying to recover from a tight spot. Our second round of house guests had a change of plans and didn’t end up staying with us, so that took a little pressure off getting the house back in order right away for their arrival.

Blessing #2: Because we rent, we were able to handle a very ugly situation with little additional cost to us. I bought three very cheap painting drop cloths from Home Depot to cover furniture and our landlord allows us to take expenses like that out of our rent, so that is what I will do for next month.

My parents flew into town last minute to take over providing for my sister. My husband and I had insisted that she stay in our apartment (along with our house guests) for two nights while she recovered because she needed 24/7 care and still had trouble standing up or sitting down and preparing her own meals.We did end up going over our grocery budget by $30 that week because of the need to provide food for these emergency circumstances. As I’ve mentioned before, I have gone far over $30 in a month before and for far less important reasons.

I had my monthly prenatal check up with the doctor in the midst of all this and found out I tested high for pregnancy diabetes. In order to get a more specific reading, I would have to fast for ten hours (which could be done overnight) and then take a three hour blood test that consisted of drawing blood four times. So you know, ask a pregnant woman to not eat all morning while stealing blood from her system and slap a little boredom on it and what do you have? A very irritable pregnant woman at the end of a long week who may or may not have diabetes.

Blessing #3: The tests came back negative and as I listened to patient after patient come into the lab having to cough up a $30 co-pay, I thanked God that my coverage made the tests free.

Then to top it all off, my husband’s grandmother died! It was at this point that we looked at each other and thought, “what else could possibly happen this week?”. This wasn’t exactly expected, but also not a total shock because she was 98, almost 99–so we knew it was eminent. No immediate action was necessary on our part, but it was still another thing on a pile of others. What a crazy time.

I haven’t had a two week period that felt quite the way this one did in a long time. Juggling thing after thing–no time to think, let alone respond to a text–all while trying to maintain your normal weekly routines and provide for others. I love the feeling of being busy, and I believe I am someone who thrives under stressful circumstances. But I was a whole new level of tired. Sleep hasn’t been as good as it used to be with a little baby growing inside me, so there were days where I felt like a zombie. I even ran a stop sign at one point, which was (thankfully) funny to my passengers (we were in a very empty warehouse-y part of town), but that was a sign that I needed to hand the wheel over to someone else–probably in more ways than one!

The thing I am most proud of when I look back on this two week period is how well my husband and I were able to work as a team to iron out anything that came our way. As much as it felt like a crisis at certain points and hilariously inconvenient at others; we trusted that each hit that came our way would be overcome. We rolled with the punches and served each other and our friends and family as best we could–and special kudos to my husband who still had to work full time amidst it all. I think a great lesson which came from this is we can get through a very stressful time without using money as a crutch, while still continuing to save (and believe me, I considered skipping a week or two of saving contributions!) and coping with discipline rather than money. I now know if we can make it through hardship and not falter financially, then there is no good excuse for failing at any other time. These kind of experiences strengthen us emotionally, but they are a great lesson in economic discipline as well.

Slowing Down Saves You Money

For the past few weeks, I have been reflecting on one of my worst features–a tendency to think too far into the future about any given thing. Sure, this can be a good quality when reasonably applied–but I’ve let it go so far that I’m mentally mapping out what next fall’s Tuesday nights look like. No joke. Someone turn this time machine off! It can also lead to unnecessary worry and even anger when I get too ahead of myself and anticipate events that might never happen. I have yet to figure out how to control this part of my brain, but I am prayerfully working on it. And while doing so–it occurred to me that this is a great application for financial success as well. Not only practicing self-control, but finding a way to slow down your life and quiet the noisy areas can help you hang onto cash where you otherwise might spend it.

How many of you have ever said to yourself, “I’ve had a hard week, I’m getting a pedicure”? Or “I deserve this ice cream because it’s been a long day”? There are countless examples of ways we pay money to reward ourselves for simply going through the motions of life. That’s not to say you can’t have a treat every now and again, but the point is…maybe eliminating the cause will lessen the effect? In my experience, the less I stress, the less I spend.

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Decluttering your friend world can be a very healthy exercise for someone who wants to lessen stress. I have long been a participant in the “big group of friends” gang–as far back as middle school. It has only been in the last year or so that I’ve truly valued the beauty of having a small inner circle of people who you invest most of your time in and it is incredibly freeing. How does this relate to finances? Well, over time you are looking at less commitments–anything from birthday parties where you’re one of twenty-five people, to seeing a person’s show that has a door charge and ticket. My husband and I went to a birthday party earlier this year where, unbeknownst to us, something like fifty people were invited and I swear every. single. one. came. We were split up into a million different tables, barely spoke to the person for whom we came and dropped $80 on the chain restaurant meal. Lesson learned. Now when we show up for something, it’s because we really want to be there to support and engage, not because we feel obligated by our (or should I say “a”) social circle. Quieting your social life saves you money.

Family planning–and I don’t mean the child kind. Having to coordinate any sort of family function– from visits here to visits there to group vacations–has kept me up at night in stress. No more. I have taken a step back from this sort of facilitating because it never changes the outcome. I’ve either relinquished control where I felt it fruitless to try, passed off responsibility to my better half, or simply left something untouched, which I wouldn’t haven’t considered an option in the past. It takes some serious discipline for this planner/thinker, but I’m doing it and it’s given me a peace of mind. I believe that clearer thinking leads to better choices and this absolutely applies to financial ones as well.

If you are a regular reader, you may have noticed my husband and I try to take a lot of small trips every other month or so. This has been an intentional, valuable part of our marriage in the pre-children era. As it’s coming to a close, we took one of our last getaways over Labor Day and even though it was fairly close to home; it cost us a lot. My next blog post might be, “A Free Day In Catalina: There’s No Such Thing”. September has been all about making up for that error in judgment. It feels painfully slow to get back to the comfortable place we were throughout most of this year.  Add to that the holiday season and a baby on the way… and you can convince yourself that the present is the new normal pretty fast. What I learned from this travel snafu was that we should have been more reflective on the need for a babymoon, considered the fact that August was already packed with travel obligations beyond our control and perhaps opted to hold off on that experience for a better time. Instead, we acted imprudently and here I am almost a month later dwelling on it. Not the way you want to end a vacation.

That’s where slowing down becomes such an important exercise. If I think too far ahead, I’ve created a tragedy in my mind where there isn’t one. I need to stop and reassess to realize that we are going to be just fine even if I feel stuck at the moment. We aren’t spending more than we have, our choices haven’t affected tithing, saving, retirement or any basic needs. We’ve just dipped below our comfort zone in terms of what we expect from ourselves. That’s not the worst thing that could happen. Plus I recently noticed that October has FIVE Fridays in it–which means FIVE paychecks! What a great opportunity to catch up.

Slowing down also means taking things as they come. Trusting that the season you are in has purpose. Not over anticipating, but not forgetting responsibilities all together. It can be a tough balancing act, but as I start to integrate this pattern of thought into my life–I find things to be simpler and more enjoyable. Even financially stable people have their tough months and that’s exactly why this blog exists–to lessen the impact of those moments. Hey! Maybe I’m developing some sort of resolution here. And maybe that’s a good goal for all of us for 2015. Try to see if you can have fewer months than you did in 2014 where you are stressed about money. I recall April being particularly bad and now I’d say September is too. That’s two so far. If it stays that way, then my goal for next year will be one month or less of stress. Sounds like a fun challenge. What are some ways you slow down in regards to finances?

Practicing Contentment Will Make You Rich

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So will the stock market, discovering gold or oil, creating a pyramid scheme, inheriting a wad of cash or inventing the next big cell phone app. See none of these in your future? Worry not, I have found the answer to all of your financial woes: enjoy the life and possessions you already have. The End. Just kidding, I have more to say. But if that’s all you take away from this post, that’s enough for me. Not only will this practice breed a more grateful attitude, you will spend less money.

As previously mentioned, I have been in a season where this idea has had to be put into practice day in and day out. Learning to be still and trust that the past few months have been rather boring is not an excuse to spend, (though everything in me wants it to be). It would be very easy to fill my days with needless shopping, eating out and pricey adventures. Instead I have tried to practice more giving, organizing the home in ways that make me more comfortable for the time being, spending time with people I care about and plotting out fun future plans. Can you imagine how much money you’d save if you enjoyed all that you have from relationships to the luxuries of your home without paying for new things all the time? After all, it’s only the past few generations that have even considered something like shopping a way to pass the time.

It’s easy to lose the excitement you once felt when you bought something new for yourself. How does one get that back? Or rather, is there a way to simply appreciate it again the way you once did? Waiting to buy is one way to ensure a lasting love for said object. A very popular exercise in the frugal stratosphere is to wait at least thirty days before making a purchase. That way you know that if after a month of waiting, you still want the item, it might be worth getting. I have practiced this effectively and not purchased many a gadget because of the time I took to think about it. Alternatively, I’ve had it backfire and watch things go on sale, then off sale, to then no longer being available. In the end, I wanted it more than I did in the first place! Of course that was more me waiting ninety days, so the problem was really user error. I recommend giving it a shot on the next want that catches your eye. This includes things like clothing or books, which most of us don’t usually give a second thought before swiping our money away.

My husband and I recently took a course at our church where a financial advisor came in and spoke to us for a few hours. One of the things he said that I thought was a very helpful reminder was “it took your parents twenty-five to thirty years to have what they now have”. I think it’s easy for my generation to forget that slow and steady wins the race. Many of us have little memory of the struggles our parents had when they were starting out and we were so young. All we see is them now; financially free, possibly retired and not stressed about money (hopefully). To imagine waiting another thirty years to “arrive” discourages me beyond belief, but I believe the principal at heart is very important. We have to be patient in our financial journey and can’t expect everything to fall into place with the snap of a finger. Everyone has their own mission that is specific to their circumstances. One of mine is not to be homeowners simply because we’re in the right life stage, have a stable a career and a kid on the way. We would be fools to use all we’ve saved that way before we know what lies ahead. Besides, the more time we spend saving, the less time (and interest) we will spend paying down a loan. And being that we live in California, not many people we know are even on this path yet. For others, this is the age you do that, and good for you. I especially admire when people know where they want to live and plant roots so early in their careers. For us, it’s a little muddier and that’s okay for now. At least that’s what I keep telling myself. 😉

This past week I’ve been feeling more happy than I have in a while and I wonder if it’s not because I am starting to get the hang of this contentment thing. It feels good to spend less and know I’m making money by not touching what we already have in the bank. Setting up an automated savings plan has trained my brain that there is a certain amount in our account that is now off limits every week. I’m looking forward to a lot of big and small plans that August has in store. I’ve said this before; it’s very helpful in one’s journey toward contentment to look forward to what lies ahead. I’m on the upswing from months of feeling like a prisoner in my own body due to pregnancy sickness. And the best season of the year begins next month! That’s what I am looking forward to most. What can you put into practice starting today to make a positive change in the way you see your future and present circumstances? It might be as simple as counting down the days until you can take out the fall decorations. What a fun activity for the whole family that doesn’t cost a dime! We frugal types have to get creative during life’s slow seasons and I’m interested to hear the ways you fight the urge to spend and even subsequently save. We can inspire each other!

Sowing Or Reaping

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Lately I’ve been reflecting on how little I have to say about the financial world. Blame it on the California drought, but man I’ve been in a dry spell with writing. See? That was a terrible joke. This is partially because I haven’t been on the hunt for any particular deals or working on any new DIY projects. In fact, I’ve been failing in some areas that are usually very important to me! I went about $150 over our grocery budget last month out of sheer laziness. Those smaller trips to the store for one or two items can really add up. But the nice thing is, there is really no consequence other than self-induced guilt. This is a welcome change from a few years back. I take comfort in that maybe for this period of our lives, we’re just steadily moving along and so there’s nothing beyond the regular (savings, retirement, bills) to strive for. I recently automated both tithing and saving transfers for the first time. It’s a great feeling, but leaves me with even less to think about! We finished being swallowed alive by my husband’s union initiation payments in June and had a few months off in our church donations due to a transition. Both things have helped us climb ahead and reach a very comfortable norm. A relief? Sure. Boring? Definitely.

One thing that I’m certain will breed more interesting topics to write on is that we are expecting our first child this winter. Oh the money saving tips and needed advice that will come with adding a new member to the family! I’m looking forward to the challenges.

MoneyBaby

It occurred to me that I have felt more like I have been in a season of reaping rather than sowing–but minus the satisfaction of a job well done. Enjoying the comforts of home and marriage has been nice, but it also hasn’t felt like the greatest accomplishment. I have been reminded many times that creating a life and all that comes with it, mainly being sick in multiple ways at once; is work in itself. I think it’s a little harder to see this stage of parenthood as that because we don’t have a physical kid in our arms to feed, put to bed, etc. But I felt contentment when I realized that what I am doing right now (suffering) is important and valuable–just not in the earthly form of a paycheck that I am used to.

And what does this mean for our finances? Well, nothing. Just that there is no second income to contribute extra to savings or splurge on things we don’t need. It’s been hard for me as I assumed these last few months before I really started showing would be where I worked the most and got in those last few big paydays before leaving the workforce all together. After all, I’ve spent the last four and a half years striving to get steady union work, and lately it has felt like the momentum was there and the offers were finally starting to become more consistent. Various non-negotiable family commitments this month prevented me from taking one job in particular that would have been the perfect high-paying send off from a producer who has given me some of my biggest gigs to date. But is that what is really most important? No. And is it even worth it when your health is at risk? The last job I worked was in my first trimester and I was throwing up on set, in questionable working conditions and stressed out of my mind because the director was a cold-hearted snake. Oops, did I write that out loud? There was no question I needed to rest after it came and went, but I am finally at a point where I wish I were working again and can’t due to other obligations. Not to mention the fact that some weeks I have as many as three weekday doctor’s appointments and there is no way I could work 60+ hours Monday through Friday and pull that off.

I guess my point is there are seasons in our lives where we think we’re only reaping the benefits of our labor (or our spouse’s)–but we are actually sowing and may not realize until later. I trust that where I am today is where I am supposed to be and take comfort in the fact that God knows better than me. It may not yet feel as satisfying as adding another accomplishment to your resume or receiving a check on Fridays, but there is no question it will trump those things in the long run. As adults, we hopefully know by now that most of life’s riches do not come in the form of money. Have you ever had a season of your life that felt boring and unaccomplished but actually turned out to be quite profitable (monetarily or otherwise)?